There are places where a voice wants to "shift" into the next register, but much of where it does end up transitioning is choice, more to do with how we have trained the voice. As you can see from the studies done on contemporary vs classical singers, where their voices "naturally" wanted to shift was different, especially in the women. Female classical singers shift into falsetto (head voice) much sooner. Classical singing for women is primarily done in this registrar so those voices were trained to sing those pitches in a lighter register. Contemporary singers tends to be more belty, and so the transitions have been trained to happen later. Where your voice "breaks" is not set in stone. You have some leeway which can be trained. 

Thyroarytenoid Dominant AKA:

Chest - Mix - Modal - M1 - TA -"Speaking"

Voice The red is the TA Muscle. The tan is the epithelium. See how the TA is pushing the folds together from the inside and how much surface is touching from bottom to top.

Cricothyroid Dominant AKA:

 Falsetto - Female head - M2 - CT - "Talk to your dog" voice

The red is the TA Muscle. The tan is the epithelium. See how the TA is not engaged at all and how little surface is touching, mostly just toward the top.

Male Head Dom mix vs Chest

Male Assending the range - Various ways